Find innovation in your library

by Traci Chun | Teacher Librarian | Skyview High School

Shh! Shh! Shh!  Gone are the days of the library being a silent space filled with books and a shushing librarian. Today’s libraries are filled with technology, innovation, learning, and yes, books. As information is shared globally with only a few keystrokes, the need for a library and a librarian is greater now than ever.

Students reading and working on robots in the library!In VPS, our libraries are staffed with teacher librarians; many who taught in classrooms before completing graduate programs in librarianship. In addition to developing and maintaining a library collection of books, our teacher librarians also manage curriculum and the circulation of iPads. They collaborate with teachers to teach information literacy skills, digital citizenship, and inquiry-based learning. Teacher librarians provide students with innovative learning experiences to support and enhance standards and projects in all subject areas. Often times it is in the library where students get their first opportunity to test out new tools adopted by the district. Spheros, BreakoutEDU, and Hummingbird robotics are some examples of innovation that have been making appearances in libraries at all levels.

Libraries will always be havens for readers and learners seeking out a safe place to study or learn new information. Books and literacy will always be the heart of a library. However, libraries are evolving to meet the needs of our students and to rise to the challenge of supporting future ready students and graduates. This means incorporating technology, new instructional strategies, and literature for an exciting library space.

Check out @VPSLibraries on Instagram to get a glimpse of exciting things happening in your student’s library. New photos from all levels will post periodically. We doubt you will find a “shushing librarian” in our photos but you will see exciting learning spaces and opportunities for all students!

2018-10-12T12:53:23+00:00September 27th, 2018|Librarian blog|
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